Celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day: Cabbage Stew and Pot o’ Gold Potato Salad

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in cooking classes, cooking with kids, holiday, nutrition, seasonal, seasonal celebrations | 0 comments

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! St. Patrick’s Day is the celebration of Ireland’s patron saint, Saint Patrick! He is said to have brought Christianity to the people of Ireland and so the Irish celebrate his life by feasting, usually on cabbage, ham, and potatoes. Today our little chefs will make a traditional Irish meal of cabbage stew and potato salad. Between the cabbage loaded with Vitamin B and our special antioxidant-rich purple potatoes, we can be sure we’re getting a meal that is not only delicious, but nutritious as well. Enjoy!

CAAABAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

CABBAGE STEW

Ingredients:

  • 4 T olive oil
  • 1 onion
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 celery stalks
  • 1 carrot
  • ¼ cabbage
  • ½ c chopped canned tomatoes
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Water (if necessary)

Directions:

  • Start with stew by cutting celery, carrots, onion, garlic and cabbage.
  • Heat oil in pan and add celery, carrots, onion and garlic to sweat.
  • Add tomatoes and cabbage  in the pot, season, cover and simmer  20 minutes.
  • Serve warm!

POT o’ GOLD POTATO SALAD

Ingredients

  • 2 medium purple potatoes
  • 1 Yukon gold potatoimages
  • 2 medium pink potatoes
  • 1 apple
  • ½ bunch parsley
  • 1 T celery seed
  • 4 T honey
  • 3 T mustard
  • 3 T red wine vinegar
  • 6 T olive oil

Directions:

  • Make potato salad by dicing cooked potatoes and placing in salad bowl.
  • Dice apples, pick parsley and add to the potatoes.
  • Add celery seed, red  wine vinegar, olive oil, mustard and honey to mixture.
  • Whisk and mix to combine.
  • Enjoy!
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Red Velvet Beet Brownies

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in cooking with kids, healthy food, nutrition, Recipes, valentines day | 0 comments

800px-Chocolate_Beetroot_BrowniesSurprise your loved ones this valentine’s day with these delightful brownies that use red beets as a natural food coloring and sweetener, and an added protein punch with black beans!

Our cooking class students are excited to whip these up, and of course indulge in their goodness!

Ingredients: 

  • 2 1/4 C oats
  • 1 medium cooked beet
  • 1/4 C unsweetened cocoa
  • 1/3 C rice milk
  • 1/4 C canola oil
  • 1/2 C black beans
  • 1/2 C maple syrup
  • 1/2 t baking powder
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1 t vanilla
  • 1/2 C chocolate chips

Directions: 

1) Preheat oven to 375F. Lightly oil an 8×8 pan.

2) Cut beet into quarters and bring to a boil. Drain, allow to cool, peel, and chop into small pieces.

3) In food processor, blend oats, cocoa, salt, and baking powder until oats are blended into fine powder.

4) Add the rice milk, oil, maple syrup, and vanilla. Mix until well combined. Then add the beets and beans to form a thick batter. Add additional milk if needed to reach brownie consistency.

5) Mix in chocolate chips by hand and pour batter into pan.

6) Bake for 20-25 minutes.

Enjoy!

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Apple Turnovers with Coconut Oil

Posted by on Jan 26, 2017 in after school, cooking classes, cooking with kids, families, healthy food, nutrition | 0 comments

5513640649_6d4c56b309_bThis week in our fun-filled cooking classes we created apple turnovers with coconut oil, served alongside an aromatic spiced apple pear butter!

Our chefs in training practiced their slicing and dicing skills, while learning about the health benefits of coconut oil which helps boost our immune system, enhances our memory, and provides us with healthy fats that help improve our cholesterol levels.

We hope that you will make memories in your family kitchen with our apple turnover recipe!

Serves 8

Ingredients:

Dough

  • 1 C whole wheat + 1 C AP flour
  • ½ t salt
  • ½ cup coconut oil, solid
  • 1/3-1/2 cup ice water

Filling

  • 4 apples
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • ½ lemon
  • ½ t cinnamon
  • ¼ t nutmeg
  • 1 T flour
  • pinch of salt
  • dried cherries, raisins (optional)

Directions:

1) Preheat oven to 375˚

2) Rinse all fruit 

3) Make the dough: Mix dry ingredients. Cut solid coconut oil in small increments using pastry blender or fork. Add water by the tablespoon until dough just comes together. Set aside. Place the dough in fridge to chill.

4) Make the filling: Slice and dice apples, and combine with lemon juice, spices, flour and salt. If the filling is too juicy from the apple juice, add a pinch more flour to absorb or drain using a colander.

5) Assemble the turnovers:

    • Cut dough into smaller pieces. Roll out into 1/8-inch thick rounds on a lightly floured surface.
    • Place ~2 T of filling on one half and sprinkle with dried cherries or raisins if desired.
    • Fold over and seal, using fork or fingers to crimp the edges. 
    • Bake at 375˚ degrees for 25 minutes, or until golden brown.
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roasted fiddlehead ferns

Posted by on May 10, 2016 in healthy food, local food, nutrition, Recipes, seasonal | 0 comments

IMG_1747Fiddlehead ferns may not be on your top list of things to eat this spring since they look somewhat prehistoric, but we suggest that you give them a try!

For those of you who are new to these funny looking vegetables, they are the edible fronds of young ostrich ferns, which grow wild in the Northeast.

These spring delicacies are high in iron, helping to build red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body.

A delicious way to eat these fabulous fronds are to roast them. They come out tasting crispy, umami and quite addicting!

Here’s how:

Prep Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 15-20 minutes

Serves 2-4

Ingredients: 

  • 4 oz. fiddlehead ferns
  • 3 T olive oil
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • salt & pepper to taste

Directions: 

1. Prep: Preheat your oven to 450F. Clean fiddleheads well. Place in a colander, and rinse under cold water thoroughly. In a large bowl, toss together the ingredients.

2. Cook: Place them on a sheet tray in a single layer and cook for 10-15 minutes, until crispy and tender.

This post was written by Flora McKay, Director of Community & Nutrition

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this is school lunch?

Posted by on Apr 5, 2016 in healthy food, lunch time, nutrition, raising children, school food | 0 comments

FullSizeRender (9)I am a Registered Dietitian with an MS in Nutrition.  Prior to joining Butter Beans I was employed by the public school system.  My job was to teach “Healthy Living” to after-school students grades K – 5.  

Initially I was impressed with the NYC school food program.  Whenever bread was served it was whole wheat.  Fresh fruit was always offered.  Milk was low-fat or skim.  Meals were served on biodegradable plates.  But as I looked closer I realized that although all the meals included a protein, starch and vegetable the choices were not always representative of these food groups.  There was a heavy focus on carbohydrates, i.e., potato or corn as vegetable often paired with an entree of pizza or a burger.  A typical example:  Cheeseburger deluxe or fish and cheese sandwich.  Deluxe toppings.  Sweet potato wedges (frozen).  Accompanied by milk (mandatory) and a fruit (fresh or frozen).  The lack of fiber, micronutrients and vitamins is obvious.  Some schools provide a salad bar.  The school where I was placed did not.  The food waste was off the hook.  

Then I met Butter Beans.  

FullSizeRender (10)On that exact same day the Butterbeans menu was BBQ pulled chicken sandwiches or herbed tofu (so delicious!), steamed kale, herbed roasted potatoes, and carrot ginger soup. All made from fresh ingredients.   

Plus the salad bar which is always available and includes at least two fresh fruits, a spread, a specialty salad, two crudités, two meats, cheeses, eggs, lettuce and greens, yogurt, granola, pickles or olives, sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches, and pita.  Milk is offered but the kids can choose.  

The immediate differences were obvious.  

Even if a child doesn’t want any of the hot food options s/he could still create a great lunch from salad bar alone.  Most make choices from both.  But equally important, in my opinion, is the minimization of food waste.  Kids are not forced to take a milk and a fruit.  They are offered the choice.  They are encouraged to “take a taste” of something they may not be sure about.  

How important is that?  

Studies have shown that even if kids are on a “food jag” or “picky eaters” that they will intuitively balance their nutritional needs over a week or so.  They just know what their body wants.  

Choices are key.  

Butter Beans offers choices to any child who may be hesitant to try a new or unfamiliar food.  We don’t require a child to take a food, instead we help them choose, educating them in the process.  

I am so proud to be a part of this food revolution!

This post was written by Tammy Chalala, Food Service Supervisor for Butter Beans

 

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spring green potato celery soup

Posted by on Mar 24, 2016 in cooking with kids, healthy food, healthy lifestyle, local food, nutrition, seasonal, sustainability | 0 comments

4904477507_bbe492a693_oEver wondered what a wildlife biologist eats to stay healthy, happy, and strong after a day of adventuring outdoors?

Well, wonder no more! Here at Butter Beans we love learning about (and sharing!) the different foods & recipes that fuel our communities. We linked up with Audubon Society’s Long Island Bird Conservation Manager Amanda Pachomski to discover her favorite healthy recipe to cook at home.

As a wildlife biologist, Amanda spends her days helping protect the Earth’s natural spaces and the many amazing creatures who live there. Ask any of the Butter Beans Food & Garden Summer Campers and they’ll tell you how important it is to care for our planet’s precious resources in order to grow and eat nourishing foods. A healthy planet means a healthy you and me!

We fell head over heals for this simple, vibrant soup and we know you will too. Its bright green color alone has us running for the kitchen. Happy cooking!

Ingredients:

1 small yellow onion

1 large bunch celery

3 large potatoes

2-3 tsp turmeric

2 cubes vegetable bullion

1 quart water

olive oil

powdered garlic

salt & pepper

Topping, opt.

½ avocado, thinly sliced

coconut oil popcorn*

Directions: Chop onion, celery, and potatoes. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in pot over medium heat. Sauté onion until softened. Add two cubes of veggie bullion. Add celery and potatoes. Sauté for additional 5-7 minutes. Add turmeric, salt, fresh black pepper, powdered garlic, and optional pinch of chili pepper. Mix well and sauté for 2-3 more minutes. Add enough water to cover veggies, bring to a boil, and cook until veggies are soft (~20 minutes). Transfer soup to food processor or use immersion blender to blend. Pour back into soup pot to hold warm. Serve soup. Top with avocado slices, coconut oil popcorn, and a sprinkling of turmeric for a decorative and delicious garnish.

*make-your-own popcorn with our recipe for stove top popcorn. Drizzle with coconut oil once popped and mix well. Voila!

 

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