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don’t they look like little cloves of garlic?

When you think of turnips your mind usually wanders to hearty winter dishes like chicken soup or roasted root vegetables.

Well guess what! Turnips grow in late spring too, and are a whole different world – flavor wise – than those that grow in fall/winter. It’s quite astonishing!

I am amazed at how nourishing they are – containing loads of vitamin K, A, C and folate, and not only do their roots provide health benefits, so do their greens.

Eating these turnips will really make you feel like you have superpowers!

The next time you’re visiting your favorite farmers market, look for turnips with bright green, lush leaves and you’re in for a double whammy. True root to leaf eating is in store.

Try these inspiring vegetables, and they may become your new favorite staple!

look at those lush greens!

look at those lush greens!

Steamed Turnip Greens:

Prep Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 10 minutes 

Serves 2-3

Ingredients: 

  • Turnip greens, well washed, coarsely chopped
  • Water, enough to line the bottom of your pan
  • Fresh lemon, to taste

Directions: 

1) Prep: Wash your greens well (they usually contain lots of sand/soil) – in a large bowl run water over them, then move them around the water well (the soil will sink to the bottom). Chop coarsely.

2) Cook: In a large pan, add water and greens. Bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, or until the greens turn bright green (try one to see if you think it’s done).

3) Serve: Squeeze some fresh lemon on top of your greens and enjoy!

Roasted Turnips:

Prep Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 35 minutes

Serves 2-3

Ingredients: 

  • Turnips, rinsed and chopped into quarters
  • Sunflower oil (or your favorite roasting oil), enough to lightly coat
  • Sea salt, to taste

Directions: 

1) Prep: Preheat your oven to 400F Rinse, and chop into quarters.

2) Cook: In a roasting pan add your turnips, drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt. Mix well. Cook for 35 minutes, or until lightly golden brown. Enjoy!

Written by Flora McKay, Director of Community & Nutrition